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Opening a business? We have a guide to help you apply for a more appropriate amount of signage here: http://goo.gl/G7CmtP. (Photo: Broadway and East 9th Street, edge of NoHo Historic District, 1937, MCNY)

Opening a business? We have a guide to help you apply for a more appropriate amount of signage here: http://goo.gl/G7CmtP. (Photo: Broadway and East 9th Street, edge of NoHo Historic District, 1937, MCNY)

The New York City Archaeological Repository opened in April and now has over 800 boxes of artifacts from multiple archaeological projects.  The repository will be home to collections from all five boroughs that convey information about who has lived in this area from its initial occupation thousands of years ago until the modern era.  We’ll be highlighting artifacts from the repository monthly.


Glass bottle seal with the arms of Col. Benjamin Fletcher, governor of New York from 1692-1697. 


Governor Fletcher was infamous for being recalled to England under suspicion of colluding with pirates that were frequent visitors to the city.  In this period, seals were used to identify the owners of the bottles.  This artifact was found during the New South Ferry Station project which uncovered portions of the colonial era battery, Whitehall Slip and landfill from the 17th-19th centuries.  

The New York City Archaeological Repository opened in April and now has over 800 boxes of artifacts from multiple archaeological projects.  The repository will be home to collections from all five boroughs that convey information about who has lived in this area from its initial occupation thousands of years ago until the modern era.  We’ll be highlighting artifacts from the repository monthly.

Glass bottle seal with the arms of Col. Benjamin Fletcher, governor of New York from 1692-1697. 

Governor Fletcher was infamous for being recalled to England under suspicion of colluding with pirates that were frequent visitors to the city.  In this period, seals were used to identify the owners of the bottles.  This artifact was found during the New South Ferry Station project which uncovered portions of the colonial era battery, Whitehall Slip and landfill from the 17th-19th centuries.  

Vintage #photobomb! Between 1939 and 1941, and again in the mid-1980s, the city photographed every house and building in the five boroughs. Visit the NYC Department of Records to see what your building looked like!

Vintage #photobomb! Between 1939 and 1941, and again in the mid-1980s, the city photographed every house and building in the five boroughs. Visit the NYC Department of Records to see what your building looked like!

In the Greenwich Village Historic District, just off MacDougal Street, sits a small private alley behind a fence and low gates. This street, MacDougal Alley, was formally created in 1833 by landowners on Washington Square North and Eighth Street to serve as a private court for their stables. Today, the small scale and charm of the individual houses, many converted from those original stables, combine to produce a singularly picturesque appearance.
(Photos: MCNY, Greenwich Village Society For Historic Preservation,Forgotten New York)

In the Greenwich Village Historic District, just off MacDougal Street, sits a small private alley behind a fence and low gates. This street, MacDougal Alley, was formally created in 1833 by landowners on Washington Square North and Eighth Street to serve as a private court for their stables. Today, the small scale and charm of the individual houses, many converted from those original stables, combine to produce a singularly picturesque appearance.

(Photos: MCNY, Greenwich Village Society For Historic Preservation,Forgotten New York)

Sep 9

A “dentil” is a small, square, tooth-like block in a series beneath a cornice, from the Latin word for “tooth.” #TheMoreYouKnow

A “dentil” is a small, square, tooth-like block in a series beneath a cornice, from the Latin word for “tooth.” #TheMoreYouKnow

Sep 5

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!
Curtis High School, 105 Hamilton Ave., Staten Island – C.B.J. Snyder, 1902-04; additions, 1922, 1925, and 1937)
Staten Island’s first secondary school building, Curtis High School was built following the consolidation of Greater New York, part of a plan to erect a major high school in each of the outlying boroughs.  The Collegiate Gothic building, situated in a campus-like setting, is named for prominent writer and orator George W. Curtis, who lived nearby. (MCNY)

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!

Curtis High School, 105 Hamilton Ave., Staten Island – C.B.J. Snyder, 1902-04; additions, 1922, 1925, and 1937)

Staten Island’s first secondary school building, Curtis High School was built following the consolidation of Greater New York, part of a plan to erect a major high school in each of the outlying boroughs.  The Collegiate Gothic building, situated in a campus-like setting, is named for prominent writer and orator George W. Curtis, who lived nearby. (MCNY)

Sep 5

Newtown High School, 48-01 90th St., Elmhurst – C.B.J. Snyder, 1920-21; Walter C. Martin, 1930-31; Maurice Salo and Associates, 1956-58
Elmhurst was originally called Newtown, and this school’s Flemish Revival design recalls the area’s Dutch origins.  The first campaign, completed under Snyder in 1921, faces 90th Street and incorporates a two-story auditorium to the east.  An impressive 169-foot tower, embellished with step gables and dormer windows, rises above the arched main entrance.  The school opened at full capacity, and within a decade two simpler but substantial wings were added. (Newtown HS)

Newtown High School, 48-01 90th St., Elmhurst – C.B.J. Snyder, 1920-21; Walter C. Martin, 1930-31; Maurice Salo and Associates, 1956-58

Elmhurst was originally called Newtown, and this school’s Flemish Revival design recalls the area’s Dutch origins.  The first campaign, completed under Snyder in 1921, faces 90th Street and incorporates a two-story auditorium to the east.  An impressive 169-foot tower, embellished with step gables and dormer windows, rises above the arched main entrance.  The school opened at full capacity, and within a decade two simpler but substantial wings were added. (Newtown HS)

Sep 5

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!
Grammar School No. 9, 460-66 West 82nd St., Manhattan – C.B.J. Snyder, 1894-96
This school is one of Snyder’s early designs and one of the few remaining nineteenth-century institutional buildings on the Upper West Side.  Between 1888-89, the vast school construction program built eight public schools in this area to meet the needs of the city’s burgeoning population.  Replacing an earlier wooden school, this five-story structure is clad in yellow ironspot Roman brick with grey limestone trim above a limestone base and features a picturesque roofline of steeped gables, finial-topped dormers, and chimney stacks.

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!

Grammar School No. 9, 460-66 West 82nd St., Manhattan – C.B.J. Snyder, 1894-96

This school is one of Snyder’s early designs and one of the few remaining nineteenth-century institutional buildings on the Upper West Side.  Between 1888-89, the vast school construction program built eight public schools in this area to meet the needs of the city’s burgeoning population.  Replacing an earlier wooden school, this five-story structure is clad in yellow ironspot Roman brick with grey limestone trim above a limestone base and features a picturesque roofline of steeped gables, finial-topped dormers, and chimney stacks.

Sep 4

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!
Morris High School, East 166th Street at Boston Rd., Bronx – C.B.J. Snyder, 1900-04
Considered by many to be C.B.J. Snyder’s masterpiece, Morris High School is intentionally situated at the highest point in the Bronx in order to provide easy access to the community.  Named in honor of Gouverneur Morris and his family’s role in the early history of the Bronx, the towering high school is the centerpiece of the Morris High School Historic District.  The main entrance is a two-story Tudor arch opening at the base of a great central tower, and is approached by a generously proportioned double flight of steps.  Snyder’s auditorium, a designated interior landmark, is a high, church-like space decorated with murals by French artist Auguste Gorguet. (MCNY)

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!

Morris High School, East 166th Street at Boston Rd., Bronx – C.B.J. Snyder, 1900-04

Considered by many to be C.B.J. Snyder’s masterpiece, Morris High School is intentionally situated at the highest point in the Bronx in order to provide easy access to the community.  Named in honor of Gouverneur Morris and his family’s role in the early history of the Bronx, the towering high school is the centerpiece of the Morris High School Historic District.  The main entrance is a two-story Tudor arch opening at the base of a great central tower, and is approached by a generously proportioned double flight of steps.  Snyder’s auditorium, a designated interior landmark, is a high, church-like space decorated with murals by French artist Auguste Gorguet. (MCNY)

Sep 4

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!
Girls’ High School, 475 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn – James W. Naughton, 1885-86, rear addition, 1891; Macon Street addition, C.B.J. Snyder, 1912
The roots of Girls’ High School extend back to the organization of the Central Grammar School, Brooklyn’s first public high school, in 1878.  As the student population increased, a new school was erected on Nostrand Avenue between Halsey and Macon Streets.  Only the Girls’ Department of Central Grammar School moved to this facility; the Boys’ Department later moved to Boys’ High School.  The Nostrand Avenue building, popularly known as Girls’ High School (the name was made official in 1891), is the oldest surviving structure in New York City erected as a high school.  The design of the Victorian Gothic building focuses on the central entrance with its tall cupola. (Photo: MCNY)

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!

Girls’ High School, 475 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn – James W. Naughton, 1885-86, rear addition, 1891; Macon Street addition, C.B.J. Snyder, 1912

The roots of Girls’ High School extend back to the organization of the Central Grammar School, Brooklyn’s first public high school, in 1878.  As the student population increased, a new school was erected on Nostrand Avenue between Halsey and Macon Streets.  Only the Girls’ Department of Central Grammar School moved to this facility; the Boys’ Department later moved to Boys’ High School.  The Nostrand Avenue building, popularly known as Girls’ High School (the name was made official in 1891), is the oldest surviving structure in New York City erected as a high school.  The design of the Victorian Gothic building focuses on the central entrance with its tall cupola. (Photo: MCNY)