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Central Park, 1862 (NYPL)

Central Park, 1862 (NYPL)

Brochures like this one advertising new and modern apartment houses were published by “developers and the real estate industry to entice potential middle and upper class tenants to New York City’s ‘principal high class apartment houses.’” This 1910 brochure features an ad for the Beaux-Art-style Rhinecliff building at 788 Riverside Drive, now within the boundaries of the Audubon Park Historic District.
Image courtesy NYPL The New York Public Library

Brochures like this one advertising new and modern apartment houses were published by “developers and the real estate industry to entice potential middle and upper class tenants to New York City’s ‘principal high class apartment houses.’” This 1910 brochure features an ad for the Beaux-Art-style Rhinecliff building at 788 Riverside Drive, now within the boundaries of the Audubon Park Historic District.

Image courtesy NYPL The New York Public Library

Painting the Brooklyn Bridge, 1915 (MCNY)

Painting the Brooklyn Bridge, 1915 (MCNY)

The anatomy of a door.

The anatomy of a door.

Oct 8

Brooklyn’s oldest public building, its Borough Hall, is shown in this undated postcard; the old elevated train line is also visible at the bottom left. The building served as Brooklyn’s City Hall from its completion in 1848 until consolidation with New York City in 1898. Read more: http://goo.gl/6gMtIg (Photo: MCNY)

Brooklyn’s oldest public building, its Borough Hall, is shown in this undated postcard; the old elevated train line is also visible at the bottom left. The building served as Brooklyn’s City Hall from its completion in 1848 until consolidation with New York City in 1898. Read more: http://goo.gl/6gMtIg (Photo: MCNY)

Oct 1

Meet New York City’s newest landmark, the Doering-Bohack House! The house, erected c. 1887 and moved to its current site in 1902, was designated at yesterday’s public meeting. An extremely handsome and ornate example of a vernacular frame house type popular in Bushwick in the 1880s and 1890s, of which there are few survivors, it may be the only remaining frame house that retains its original detailing by the prominent Brooklyn architect Theobald Engelhardt. Read more about the house here: http://goo.gl/vxIRAe.

Meet New York City’s newest landmark, the Doering-Bohack House! The house, erected c. 1887 and moved to its current site in 1902, was designated at yesterday’s public meeting. An extremely handsome and ornate example of a vernacular frame house type popular in Bushwick in the 1880s and 1890s, of which there are few survivors, it may be the only remaining frame house that retains its original detailing by the prominent Brooklyn architect Theobald Engelhardt. Read more about the house here: http://goo.gl/vxIRAe.

Oct 1

It’s #Archtober!  Astor Library, now the The Public Theater, was New York’s first public library, built with a bequest from John Jacob Astor.  The building, which appears to be a single unified structure, was actually erected in three campaigns, each by a different architect.  The German-born Alexander Saeltzer established the building’s form with his use of the German round-arched style, or Rundbogenstil, with its roots in Northern Italian Romanesque design.  The building served for many years as the headquarters of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society but was vacant and endangered in 1965 when the theatrical producer Joseph Papp persuaded the city to acquire it.  In 1966 architect Giorgio Vacaglieri converted the building for use by one of America’s most innovative theatrical institutions.  In recent years, all the windows have been beautifully restored by Buck Cane Architects.

It’s #Archtober!  Astor Library, now the The Public Theater, was New York’s first public library, built with a bequest from John Jacob Astor.  The building, which appears to be a single unified structure, was actually erected in three campaigns, each by a different architect.  The German-born Alexander Saeltzer established the building’s form with his use of the German round-arched style, or Rundbogenstil, with its roots in Northern Italian Romanesque design.  The building served for many years as the headquarters of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society but was vacant and endangered in 1965 when the theatrical producer Joseph Papp persuaded the city to acquire it.  In 1966 architect Giorgio Vacaglieri converted the building for use by one of America’s most innovative theatrical institutions.  In recent years, all the windows have been beautifully restored by Buck Cane Architects.

Opening a business? We have a guide to help you apply for a more appropriate amount of signage here: http://goo.gl/G7CmtP. (Photo: Broadway and East 9th Street, edge of NoHo Historic District, 1937, MCNY)

Opening a business? We have a guide to help you apply for a more appropriate amount of signage here: http://goo.gl/G7CmtP. (Photo: Broadway and East 9th Street, edge of NoHo Historic District, 1937, MCNY)

The New York City Archaeological Repository opened in April and now has over 800 boxes of artifacts from multiple archaeological projects.  The repository will be home to collections from all five boroughs that convey information about who has lived in this area from its initial occupation thousands of years ago until the modern era.  We’ll be highlighting artifacts from the repository monthly.


Glass bottle seal with the arms of Col. Benjamin Fletcher, governor of New York from 1692-1697. 


Governor Fletcher was infamous for being recalled to England under suspicion of colluding with pirates that were frequent visitors to the city.  In this period, seals were used to identify the owners of the bottles.  This artifact was found during the New South Ferry Station project which uncovered portions of the colonial era battery, Whitehall Slip and landfill from the 17th-19th centuries.  

The New York City Archaeological Repository opened in April and now has over 800 boxes of artifacts from multiple archaeological projects.  The repository will be home to collections from all five boroughs that convey information about who has lived in this area from its initial occupation thousands of years ago until the modern era.  We’ll be highlighting artifacts from the repository monthly.

Glass bottle seal with the arms of Col. Benjamin Fletcher, governor of New York from 1692-1697. 

Governor Fletcher was infamous for being recalled to England under suspicion of colluding with pirates that were frequent visitors to the city.  In this period, seals were used to identify the owners of the bottles.  This artifact was found during the New South Ferry Station project which uncovered portions of the colonial era battery, Whitehall Slip and landfill from the 17th-19th centuries.  

Vintage #photobomb! Between 1939 and 1941, and again in the mid-1980s, the city photographed every house and building in the five boroughs. Visit the NYC Department of Records to see what your building looked like!

Vintage #photobomb! Between 1939 and 1941, and again in the mid-1980s, the city photographed every house and building in the five boroughs. Visit the NYC Department of Records to see what your building looked like!