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The oldest surviving house in New York City is the Pieter Claesen Wyckoff House in Brooklyn. Built circa 1645 with a 1740s addition, this wooden, one-story farmhouse is an example of the Flemish Medieval Survival and the Dutch Colonial styles of architecture. The house remained in the Wyckoff family from its construction until 1901. In 1965, the house became New York City’s first Landmark. Today, the building is a museum. 

Photo: NYPL

The oldest surviving house in New York City is the Pieter Claesen Wyckoff House in Brooklyn. Built circa 1645 with a 1740s addition, this wooden, one-story farmhouse is an example of the Flemish Medieval Survival and the Dutch Colonial styles of architecture. The house remained in the Wyckoff family from its construction until 1901. In 1965, the house became New York City’s first Landmark. Today, the building is a museum. 

Photo: NYPL

The oldest surviving structure in Queens is the Lent Homestead, a Dutch Colonial farmhouse, which dates from about 1729. The materials of the farmhouse, which include fieldstone and hewn timbers and siding, are representative of Seventeenth Century farmhouses.

Photo: The Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead, www.rikerhome.com.

The oldest surviving structure in Queens is the Lent Homestead, a Dutch Colonial farmhouse, which dates from about 1729. The materials of the farmhouse, which include fieldstone and hewn timbers and siding, are representative of Seventeenth Century farmhouses.

Photo: The Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead, www.rikerhome.com.

This 1848 daguerreotype of a house in today’s Upper West Side is thought to be the oldest photo of New York City. See how much the image sold for at auction in 2009: http://goo.gl/rbWDaZ

This 1848 daguerreotype of a house in today’s Upper West Side is thought to be the oldest photo of New York City. See how much the image sold for at auction in 2009: http://goo.gl/rbWDaZ

The Billiou-Stillwell-Perine House, although built in several phases, contains the oldest surviving wing of any house on Staten Island. Built around 1679, this section of the house is distinctive for its steep medieval type roof and boasts an immense Dutch fireplace with a huge chimney head supported on two wooden posts. Today, the house is part of Historic Richmond Town.
Photo: NYPL

The Billiou-Stillwell-Perine House, although built in several phases, contains the oldest surviving wing of any house on Staten Island. Built around 1679, this section of the house is distinctive for its steep medieval type roof and boasts an immense Dutch fireplace with a huge chimney head supported on two wooden posts. Today, the house is part of Historic Richmond Town.

Photo: NYPL

Architect Marcel Breuer’s remarkable trapezoidal structure, Begrisch Hall, was designed as part of an expansion of the University Heights campus at Bronx Community College.  Executed in reinforced concrete, this daring modern design features a pair of sloping cantilevers that appear to defy gravity.  These forms reflect the specific programming requirements for the college, namely steep-floored lecture halls.  The building was completed in 1961.

Hungarian-born Breuer, one of the first students at the Bauhaus and a life-long friend of its founder Walter Gropius, was responsible for more than 100 buildings, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, as well as several well-known Modernist furniture designs like the Wassily Chair.

The Van Cortlandt Mansion, built in 1748, is the oldest surviving house in the Bronx. The house and its surrounding land were owned for generations by the Van Cortlandt family. The site played a significant role in the Revolutionary War. It was from here that General Washington deceived British troops by keeping campfires burning for several days, while he was able to safely withdraw his troops across the Hudson. Today, the house is owned by the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and is a museum that is open to the public.   
Photo: NYPL

The Van Cortlandt Mansion, built in 1748, is the oldest surviving house in the Bronx. The house and its surrounding land were owned for generations by the Van Cortlandt family. The site played a significant role in the Revolutionary War. It was from here that General Washington deceived British troops by keeping campfires burning for several days, while he was able to safely withdraw his troops across the Hudson. Today, the house is owned by the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and is a museum that is open to the public.   

Photo: NYPL

Fraunces Tavern, built in 1719, is the earliest of the 18th century buildings still standing in Manhattan. It is notable as the location from which George Washington said farewell to his officers after the departure of British soldiers from New York City in 1783, and as the space in which the New York State Chamber of Commerce was founded in 1768. Today, the building is a museum that focuses on the history of New York City as it relates to Colonial America, the Revolutionary War, and the Early Republic. 

Photo: MCNY, 1908

Jul 9

During the first quarter of the 20th century, the Aeolian Company was a leading manufacturer player pianos. Constructed between 1925-1927, Warren and Wetmore’s restrained and graceful neo-Classical design features French Renaissance style detailing, including upper setback portions with angles and concave curves, ornamental bronze, carved garlands, and other decorative elements.

A 1984 New York Times article described the building as “a lyrical…gem…that may be the city’s most inventive merging of modern commercial design with French and classical architectural detail…as good a reminder as New York has that architecture can be exuberant and fanciful yet discreet and well-mannered.”

Although the Aeolian Company vacated the building in 1938, since 1930, this has been the location of the flagship Elizabeth Arden Red Door Salon, founded by Florence Nightingale Graham, one of the most successful American businesswomen of all time. (Photos: MCNY)

Jul 9

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower at 1 Madison Avenue under construction in 1908. Between completion in 1909 and 1913, it was the tallest building in the world at 54 stories. (Photo: MCNY)

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower at 1 Madison Avenue under construction in 1908. Between completion in 1909 and 1913, it was the tallest building in the world at 54 stories. (Photo: MCNY)

Jul 8

A lovely view of the Woolworth building through the archway of the Municipal Building.  (Image: MCNY)

A lovely view of the Woolworth building through the archway of the Municipal Building.  (Image: MCNY)